Policing at a distance and that human thing: An appreciative critique of police surveillance

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Policing technologies are increasingly being developed to surveil and control people from afar. This is especially true in relation to cross-border crimes and other global threats where the necessity of monitoring such illegal flows is often advocated. In the literature, this is sometimes referred to as “policing at a distance,” signifying how the growth in different policing technologies is allowing police to oversee people without coming into physical contact with them. Overall, scholars find this development alarming. It is alarming because it reduces human lives to data points and because studies have shown how policing at a distance may trigger hateful police attitudes. With these problems of policing at a distance in mind, this article explores how an increasing use of surveillance technologies affects Danish detectives.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFocaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology
Volume2019
Issue number85
Pages (from-to)51-64
ISSN0920-1297
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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