Theorising the EU's diplomatic service: Rational player or social body?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Standard

Theorising the EU's diplomatic service : Rational player or social body? / Adler-Nissen, Rebecca.

The European External Action Service : European Diplomacy Post-Westphalia. ed. / David Spence; Jozef Batora. Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. p. 17-40 (The European Union in International Affairs).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Adler-Nissen, R 2015, Theorising the EU's diplomatic service: Rational player or social body? in D Spence & J Batora (eds), The European External Action Service : European Diplomacy Post-Westphalia. Palgrave Macmillan, The European Union in International Affairs, pp. 17-40.

APA

Adler-Nissen, R. (2015). Theorising the EU's diplomatic service: Rational player or social body? In D. Spence, & J. Batora (Eds.), The European External Action Service : European Diplomacy Post-Westphalia (pp. 17-40). Palgrave Macmillan. The European Union in International Affairs

Vancouver

Adler-Nissen R. Theorising the EU's diplomatic service: Rational player or social body? In Spence D, Batora J, editors, The European External Action Service : European Diplomacy Post-Westphalia. Palgrave Macmillan. 2015. p. 17-40. (The European Union in International Affairs).

Author

Adler-Nissen, Rebecca. / Theorising the EU's diplomatic service : Rational player or social body?. The European External Action Service : European Diplomacy Post-Westphalia. editor / David Spence ; Jozef Batora. Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. pp. 17-40 (The European Union in International Affairs).

Bibtex

@inbook{650610c7a45e433a9c5bd21552b0ed5f,
title = "Theorising the EU's diplomatic service: Rational player or social body?",
abstract = "This chapter teases out the different theorisations – or conceptual frameworks – of the EEAS in order to show how they – whether implicitly or not – make a difference to our understanding of the EEAS. The chapter first provides an overview of existing approaches to the EU’s diplomatic service, examining specifically two main approaches to the EEAS: the rationalist approach (including intergovernmentalism, rational choice institutionalism and rationalist organisation theory) and the constructivist approach (including sociological institutionalism and sociological organisation theory). The chapter then demonstrates how these approaches paint contrasting portraits of the EEAS: as a rational political player seeking autonomy from its principals (the member states) or as a social body or organisational arena with norm-abiding civil servants trying to make sense of the new diplomatic world. These theoretically informed portraits of the EEAS build on different assumptions about the nature of European integration, diplomacy and social science. The chapter points to possible blank spots on the map and the potential contribution of approaches currently not widely adopted in the study of the EEAS, including legal-constitutional frameworks, diplomatic theory, network theory, practice theory, anthropology and democratic theory.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, EEAS, EU foreign policy, diplomacy, European Union, Foreign Policy, EU, Theory, European Integration Theory",
author = "Rebecca Adler-Nissen",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781137383020",
pages = "17--40",
editor = "David Spence and Jozef Batora",
booktitle = "The European External Action Service",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Theorising the EU's diplomatic service

T2 - Rational player or social body?

AU - Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This chapter teases out the different theorisations – or conceptual frameworks – of the EEAS in order to show how they – whether implicitly or not – make a difference to our understanding of the EEAS. The chapter first provides an overview of existing approaches to the EU’s diplomatic service, examining specifically two main approaches to the EEAS: the rationalist approach (including intergovernmentalism, rational choice institutionalism and rationalist organisation theory) and the constructivist approach (including sociological institutionalism and sociological organisation theory). The chapter then demonstrates how these approaches paint contrasting portraits of the EEAS: as a rational political player seeking autonomy from its principals (the member states) or as a social body or organisational arena with norm-abiding civil servants trying to make sense of the new diplomatic world. These theoretically informed portraits of the EEAS build on different assumptions about the nature of European integration, diplomacy and social science. The chapter points to possible blank spots on the map and the potential contribution of approaches currently not widely adopted in the study of the EEAS, including legal-constitutional frameworks, diplomatic theory, network theory, practice theory, anthropology and democratic theory.

AB - This chapter teases out the different theorisations – or conceptual frameworks – of the EEAS in order to show how they – whether implicitly or not – make a difference to our understanding of the EEAS. The chapter first provides an overview of existing approaches to the EU’s diplomatic service, examining specifically two main approaches to the EEAS: the rationalist approach (including intergovernmentalism, rational choice institutionalism and rationalist organisation theory) and the constructivist approach (including sociological institutionalism and sociological organisation theory). The chapter then demonstrates how these approaches paint contrasting portraits of the EEAS: as a rational political player seeking autonomy from its principals (the member states) or as a social body or organisational arena with norm-abiding civil servants trying to make sense of the new diplomatic world. These theoretically informed portraits of the EEAS build on different assumptions about the nature of European integration, diplomacy and social science. The chapter points to possible blank spots on the map and the potential contribution of approaches currently not widely adopted in the study of the EEAS, including legal-constitutional frameworks, diplomatic theory, network theory, practice theory, anthropology and democratic theory.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - EEAS

KW - EU foreign policy

KW - diplomacy

KW - European Union

KW - Foreign Policy

KW - EU

KW - Theory

KW - European Integration Theory

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 9781137383020

SN - 113738302X

SP - 17

EP - 40

BT - The European External Action Service

A2 - Spence, David

A2 - Batora, Jozef

PB - Palgrave Macmillan

ER -

ID: 142147524